Social Media Round-Up

FACEBOOK – I’ve been on Facebook since Easter Sunday March 31ST 2013. I was active on it until New Year’s Eve Sunday December 31ST 2017. This blog appeared on there during much of that time. At the start of 2018 I brought my blog back to its previous home – right here on WordPress. I’m still on Facebook, but I no longer post original material. I’m only on there because most of my social media friends are on there. I like / love some of their posts, and I comment occasionally. Most of the time I just read and move on – including all of the political posts. I keep my political viewpoints to myself. I wish others did as well. Facebook was a lot more fun before it became saturated with politics – much of it filled with innuendos, exaggerations, fabrications, rage, and hatred – from both sides.

TWITTER – In a few days I’ll observe my 11TH Anniversary on Twitter. I’ve tweeted over 8,400 times over these past 11 years – much less nowadays than I used to. I mostly utilize my Twitter account to announce new blog posts here on WordPress, and that’s an automatic process. Every so often I’ll tweet lyrics from a current song I like. Sometimes I’ll tweet a random thought. My last 5 tweets can be viewed right here on my blog (right-hand column below the calendar – if you’re on the web site).

FLICKR – My longtime photo storage site (since 2011) is Flickr. I’ve got over 3,200 photos on the site, and 88½% of them are public for the whole world to see. They are mostly vacation photos from over the years – from as far west as the Hawaiian islands, as far south as Fanning Island Kiribati, as far east as Saint-Martin / Sint Maarten, and as far north as Niagara Falls. I’m currently adding photos from my recent Orange Beach Alabama vacation. My last 5 photos can be viewed right here on my blog (right-hand column below my tweets – if you’re on the web site).

WORDPRESS – And here we are – the social media site that I’ve been on for the longest time – since the end of 2007. (I know I abandoned it for over 7 years while I was tweeting and Facebooking.) This is my 1,801ST blog post here on WordPress – and 480TH since I returned at the start of 2018. I have a lot of new readers on here, and I welcome each and every one of you to my blog. I blog 4 times per week – Thursdays, Fridays, Sundays, and Mondays. My blog posts go live at 3 AM U.S. East Coast time on most of those days, so that’s 12 AM on the U.S. West Coast, 8 AM in the United Kingdom, 9 AM in South Africa, 12 PM in India, 5 PM on Australia’s East Coast, and 7 PM in New Zealand. (I’ve got followers in all of those great places around the globe.)

The best place to check-out my blog is at my home page at revchrismday.com. It’s also where you can link to my Twitter and Flickr. If you think that you have a similar blog that I may be interested in then comment on any of my recent blog posts. No spam please. WordPress will automatically capture it, and if it slips through then I’ll delete it. If you already follow my blog then there’s a good chance that I’m probably already checking-out your blog occasionally. Keep up the great writing !

All rights reserved (c) 2020 Christopher M. Day, CountUp Ministries

My Last 2 Years On Active Duty Air Force

National Military Appreciation Month continues on this 3RD Thursday of the month with my own appreciation of my 35-year career with the United States Air Force. It’s no secret that I’m currently in the greatest 13-year era of my career. It started at the end of July of 2007, and it continues to this day. But there’s a runner-up to this great era, and that’s January 1991 to February 1993.

I was sent to war (Operation Desert Shield / Storm) as 1991 began. I didn’t volunteer for it. I’m actually quite antiwar. I was sent as punishment by my supervisors at the time. They didn’t like me, and they made life miserable for me. I threatened to report them for harassment. Before I could take action on that they sent me away to Saudi Arabia.

As it turns out my deployment overseas into the war zone turned out to be the turning point of my career back then. I was scared over there due to an uncertain future, but I also made new friends with fellow airmen from other bases, and I matured quite a bit in “Tent City” in the desert. I flopped at building fuel tanks, but I exceled at building bombs.

When I returned home to Homestead AFB after the war I was immediately sent home to my family near Washington D.C. for up to 30 days of uncharged “rest and recuperation” leave. When I returned to the base I met my brand new supervisor. You see my previous supervisor, and a few others as well – were relieved of their duties and sent away while I was away. I wasn’t informed of the specifics, but the outcome was great. There was even a reorganization of our squadron and flight structure. We even moved to a different building down towards the other end of the airfield. It continued the peak of my career at that time that started at wartime.

And then Hurricane Andrew destroyed the base. I became a “refugee” at Andrews AFB Maryland. I picked that base because it was my hometown base at the time – closest to my family. I really liked my supervisor and coworkers at my new base. They treated me nice. They respected me. I respected them. I informed them quite early on that I would not be reenlisting for a 3RD 4-year term in early-1993, so they had me for about 6 months to do what they wanted with me. They had me teach them everything I knew about the computer system and database that we managed and utilized in my career field at that time. They were so impressed that they had me teach the rest of the base as well. I was essentially a teacher for my 6 months there. They gave me a bunch of awards for my work during my short stay there – the most prominent of which hangs on my wall just above my computer workstation here.

My last duty day was the same day that the World Trade Center in New York City was bombed the first time around (Friday February 26TH 1993). We found out about the bombing via overhead TV sets at Pizza Hut where we had my farewell luncheon. I went on “terminal leave” for a month after that, and at the end of March I was officially out of the Air Force after nearly 8 years, or so I thought …

gray plane inside hangar
Photo by Kelly Lacy on Pexels.com

All rights reserved (c) 2020 Christopher M. Day, CountUp Ministries